World Cornea Congress spotlights Fuchs dystrophy

Kathryn A. Colby, MD, PhD, discusses highlights of the World Cornea Congress, which was held recently in Chicago.

Video transcript

Note: This transcript has been lightly edited for clarity.

Kathryn A. Colby, MD, PhD, New York University Langone Health: Hello, everyone. I'm Dr. Kathryn Colby. I'm the Elizabeth J. Cohen Professor and chairman of the Department of Ophthalmology at NYU Grossman School of Medicine. I'm also the immediate past president of the Cornea Society, and was one of the three organizers of the World Cornea Congress, which just took place.

This meeting, which was originally scheduled for 2020 and canceled due to COVID, took place in Chicago for two days. At the end of September, we drew over 1000 registrants from all over the world.

I'd like to highlight just a single session on Fuchs dystrophy. Everyone knows that we've had tremendous advances in our surgical care of Fuchs dystrophy. And we had a spotlight thinking about what the future will be like for care of this very common corneal disease.

And I'm sure you'll be interested to know that over 50% of our people in the audience think that cultured cells are the future for the care of food dystrophy. And in 10 or 15 years, we will be doing vanishingly few endothelial keratoplasty, instead relying on medical therapy, including gene therapy, to help treat this common disease. So anyone who's interested, the programming is available online, and I encourage you to look for it. Thank you.

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