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WIO 2023: Multimodal imaging in uveitis

News
Video

Laura Kopplin, MD, PhD, spoke with our team to share insights from her presentation at the Women in Ophthalmology Summer Symposium 2023 in Marco Island, Florida.

Laura Kopplin, MD, PhD, spoke with our team to share insights from her presentation at the Women in Ophthalmology Summer Symposium 2023 in Marco Island, Florida.

Video Transcript

Editor's note - This transcript has been edited for clarity.

Peg Achenbach, OD, FAAO:

We're here at Women in Ophthalmology with Dr. Laura Kopplin. And she's going to say a few words about her presentation on multimodal imaging in uveitis.

Laura Kopplin, MD, PhD

Hi, thanks for coming to my talk today those of you that attended. We did five pearls about multimodal imaging in uveitis that focused on several different key techniques. One is fundus autofluorescence and how beneficial that can be for white dots where we see that hyper autofluorescence and active lesions. As well as for some of our blackcoin posterior uveitis where we can look exactly for certain images for active lesions along the edge. We take autoflorescent and know we're getting our treatment outcomes that we want as they turn to hypo autofluorescence. We look at what are some of the key times you want us to fluorescein angiogram in particular maybe for those patients with new scatomas, new photopsia, new symptoms were their clinical exam hasn't changed, but you want to make sure that there isn't some unknown vasculitis going on. We talked a little bit too about one can't miss diagnosis, looking at placoid syphilitic lesions and if you see it have you 100% recognize those fundus photo pictures and particularly the OCT findings where you get that loss of the older retinal laminations and oftentimes it's pyramidal RPD types of elevations. You see that you got to check em for syphyllis, cause you got to get it treated. And then we finished off talking about how ICG is maybe not totally dead as an imaging modality and how it can have some benefit for these keratitis physicians. Sometimes when you're just not sure but there's definitely seems to be something going on inflammation wise diagnosing [inaudible] and then how [inaudible] is a little bit of a non invasive way to follow some of those changes over time [inaudible] ICG so I hope that that helps you at home as well learn a little bit

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