Technology and eyes

August 10, 2011

In an effort to assess and address the vision-related effects of the increased use of technology in learning environments, the American Optometric Association (AOA) has conducted a survey and released a report.

St. Louis-In an effort to assess and address the vision-related effects of the increased use of technology in learning environments, the American Optometric Association (AOA) has conducted a survey and released a report.

“Today’s classroom technology is extremely visual, making it critical for students to maintain excellent eye health,” said James Sheedy, OD, PhD, an AOA technology and vision expert. “Binocular vision, focusing abilities, as well as nearsightedness and farsightedness should be checked by an eye doctor yearly, particularly as students head back to school.”

The AOA’s 2011 American Eye-Q survey found that parents have some concerns about the effects of the evolving use of technology:

62% of parents responding estimated that their children spend 1 to 4 hours each day using a computer, video game, mp3 player, or hand-held electronic device.
53% of participants with children aged 18 or fewer years said they believe that viewing of 3D materials is harmful to a child’s vision or eyes.
29% of parents said they are “very concerned” that their children may damage their eyes due to prolonged use of computers or hand-held electronic devices.
10% of survey respondents reported that their children experienced headaches, 7% indicated their children felt nauseous, and 6% said their children felt dizzy after using 3D technology.

The organization developed a new report, “3D in the Classroom–An AOA Report,” in collaboration with educators, vision researchers, and 3D industry experts to explain the optimal uses of 3D technology in the classroom to teachers, students, and parents. To download a copy, visit www.3deyehealth.org.

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