Presbyopia-correcting IOL receives high marks

The IOL has a hybrid design that combines the benefits of central extended depth-of-focus technology and multifocal technology that provides a continuous range of high-quality vision ranging from distance and intermediate and near vision to about 12 to 14 inches.

Reviewed by William C. Christie, MD

The presbyopia-correcting IOL, (Tecnis Synergy Model ZFR00V, Johnson & Johnson Surgical Vision Inc), performed exceedingly well in 2 studies that used questionnaires to assess the surgeon and patient responses to the IOL performance, according to William Christie, MD, who is in private practice in Pittsburgh.

The lens received FDA approval in 2021.

“The Synergy IOL is the next-generation presbyopia-correcting IOL,” Christie commented.

The IOL has a hybrid design that combines the benefits of central extended depth-of-focus technology and multifocal technology that provides a continuous range of high-quality vision ranging from distance and intermediate and near vision to about 12 to 14 inches, Christie explained.

The investigators conducted 2 prospective studies, 1 a bilateral, multicenter, clinical trial that was carried out in Germany, Spain, Philippines, Singapore, and New Zealand referred to as the global study and 1 multicenter trial in the US at 15 sites in western Pennsylvania, referred to as the US study. The studies included adults who had less than 1.0 D of predicted postoperative corneal astigmatism and underwent bilateral crystalline lens removal and implantation with the IOL under study. Emmetropia was targeted in both eyes.

Questionnaire findings

The results in both studies showed that about 88% of the participants reported spectacle and contact lens independence at all distances.

Regarding patient satisfaction, 89% of the patients in the US study reported being completely or mostly satisfied with the performance of the IOL, and 81.1% in the global group reported being satisfied with the overall vision with not having to wear glasses.

Surgeon satisfaction with the clinical outcomes and surgical experience, registered 96.8% and 100%, respectively, in the global group.

The limited amount of spectacle wear time achieved with this IOL was the same between studies conducted in the US and globally and at different time points after surgery (3 months and 6 months) and led to high satisfaction rates among the patients and surgeons.

“Most importantly,” Christie commented, “the majority of patients were considered 20-happy.’”

William C. Christie, MD

E: wchristiemd@aol.com

This article is adapted from Christie’s presentation at the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery’s recent annual meeting in Washington, DC. He is a consultant to Johnson + Johnson Surgical Vision.