Platform procures precision

January 1, 2012
Cheryl Guttman Krader, BS, Pharm

Using a femtosecond laser to create the capsulotomy results in an incremental, but statistically significant, improvement in the accuracy of refractive outcomes after cataract surgery.

Orlando, FL-Using a femtosecond laser to create the capsulotomy results in an incremental, but statistically significant, improvement in the accuracy of refractive outcomes after cataract surgery, said Warren E. Hill, MD, at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

The achieved mean refractive spherical equivalent (MRSE) at 6 months relative to the intended refractive target was used as a surrogate endpoint for the effective lens position (ELP), and the refractive accuracy of the two procedures was compared using the mean absolute error of the refractive outcomes. Mean standard deviation (SD) from target MRSE was significantly less for the laser group than for the eyes with the manually created capsulorhexis, –0.21 (0.39) D versus 0.55 (0.41) D; values for mean (SD) absolute deviation from target MRSE in the two groups were 0.42 (0.39) D and 0.59 (0.35) D, respectively, with the difference between groups also being statistically significant.

"We know that a perfect capsulorhexis helps improve refractive outcomes after cataract surgery because of its effect on ELP, but until now we haven't known exactly how much," Dr. Hill said. "This study provides information about the influence of ELP on refractive predictability, and based on the comparison with a predictive mathematical mode, the data I am reporting make sense."

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