Meeting looks to the future of vision research

April 1, 2010

"For sight: the future of eye and vision research" is the theme of the 2010 meeting of the Association for Research in Vision in Ophthalmology.

Fort Lauderdale, FL-"For Sight: The future of eye and vision research" is the theme of the 2010 annual meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) here, Sunday, May 2, to Thursday, May 6.

The eye and vision research arena is undergoing dramatic changes in technology, communications, careers, and funding, and the annual meeting promises to bring together an international group of researchers to explore this changing environment and its implications in the future.

Before the meeting

The ARVO Clinical Trials Education Series also will be Saturday. The topic will be Managing and Designing Clinical Trials in Eye Research. The ARVO/ISIE Meeting on Saturday will focus on ophthalmic imaging. The 6th Annual ARVO/Pfizer Ophthalmics Research Institute, set for April 30 and May 1, will focus on research in optic nerve degeneration and repair and accelerate research through networking and collaboration.

Also, the 13th Annual Vision Research Conference: Retinal Ganglion Cells will be held April 30 and May 1, and Pan-American Research Day will be held May 1.

At the meeting

Chemical engineer Robert S. Langer, ScD, David H. Koch Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and pioneering biomedical researcher, will present the keynote lecture, "The Future of Regenerative Medicine in Ophthalmology," at the Keynote Session on Sunday from 5:15 to 7 p.m.

The Basic/Clinical Lecture will be held Sunday from 2:45 to 4:45 p.m. The topic is "Emerging Stem Cell Therapies for Eye Diseases." This event is presented from a basic research perspective to clinical researchers.

ARVO annually honors distinguished leaders in the field. This year's Proctor Medal, presented for outstanding research in the basic or clinical sciences as applied to ophthalmology, is being given to Richard H. Masland, PhD, of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School. He is being honored for his contributions to the understanding of the retina as a system that processes images and transmits them to the brain and for enduring characterization of the diversity, numerosity, morphology, and functional properties of many types of retinal cells in widely used preparations.

The Friedenwald Award, presented for outstanding research in the basic or clinical sciences as applied to ophthalmology, is being given to Rachel R. Caspi, PhD, of the National Eye Institute for her contributions to ocular and systemic immunology.

The Mildred Weisenfeld Award and Lecture, presented in recognition of distinguished scholarly contributions to the clinical practice of ophthalmology, is being given to George L. Spaeth, MD, of the Wills Eye Institute for his contributions to the gonioscopic evaluation of glaucoma and to the education of two generations of ophthalmic physicians.

The Cogan Award, presented in recognition of a researcher, 40 years of age or younger, who has made important and worthwhile contributions to research in ophthalmology or visual science that are directly related to disorders of the human eye or visual system, will go to Jayakrishna Ambati, MD, of University of Kentucky. He is being honored for his contributions to the understanding of the role of innate immune mechanisms, and macrophages in particular, in angiogenesis, including establishing that macrophages can be anti-angiogenic, and advancing their potential role in the understanding the mechanisms and treatment of age-related macular degeneration.

The Special Recognition Award is presented for outstanding service to ARVO and/or the vision research community. This year, it is being given to Christina Fasser of Retina International for her contributions in the fight to cure retinal degenerative diseases, acting as spokesperson for the needs of patients, and being an information conduit between patients, investigators, and funding agencies.