Incoming and outgoing presidents act on initiatives

April 22, 2012

Outgoing president of the ASCRS, Edward J. Holland, MD, can be recognized for a number of accomplishments and the introduction of several new initiatives. Likewise, the association's incoming president, David F. Chang, MD, will be building on his predecessor's work, but also aims to promote programs fostering certain core values.

Chicago-Outgoing president of the ASCRS, Edward J. Holland, MD, can be recognized for a number of accomplishments and the introduction of several new initiatives. Likewise, the association’s incoming president, David F. Chang, MD, will be building on his predecessor’s work, but also aims to promote programs fostering certain core values.

Delivering his address during the ASCRS opening general session, Dr. Holland outlined the recent efforts of the ASCRS government relations committee and discussed the initiatives he launched with the support of the ASCRS executive committee and governing board. The latter include broadening physician involvement within the organization, an increased focus on residents and fellows, and most controversial, support of an integrated eye-care practice model aimed at solving the impending crisis in the ability of ophthalmologists to deliver adequate eye care.

“This integrated delivery model will encourage greater efficiency as optometrists and ophthalmologists work together to meet the growing demands for service as well as address pending changes in Medicare and general health-care delivery,” said Dr. Holland, professor of ophthalmology, University of Cincinnati, and director of cornea services, Cincinnati Eye Institute.

He also announced that to support this model, the ASCRS leadership has decided to establish an optometric membership category within the organization.

“This is a bold and aggressive step, but one that the board agrees is the correct path,” Dr. Holland said.

Dr. Chang told attendees that during the coming year, the physician leadership of ASCRS will continue to work diligently on many important education and advocacy fronts. In addition, he discussed efforts that will support the three core values he hopes the ophthalmology community will continue to embrace and foster: willingness to teach and help one another, charity, and professional ethics.

“I am grateful for these three values and traditions that characterize our profession and are the legacy of our mentors,” said Dr. Chang, clinical professor of ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco. “I hope that future generations of ophthalmologists will similarly look back upon us with respect and appreciation for our integrity, our charity, and our willingness to help each other professionally.”

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