Diagnostic software for microkeratome enhances safety of flap creation

April 15, 2007

New diagnostic software for a proprietary microkeratome (Carriazo-Pendular, Schwind eye-tech-solutions) enhances the safety of flap creation.

Key Points

"LASIK continues to be the most popular refractive procedure performed around the world because of its favorable safety profile and reproducibly good outcomes," said Dr. Kymionis, Institute of Vision & Optics, University of Crete, Greece. "However, potential unpredictable flaps and flap complications continue to be drawbacks of the procedure.

"I have used [this particular] microkeratome for 3 years in more than 800 eyes and have been very pleased with its performance," Dr. Kymionis said. "However, this new diagnostic software is a welcome addition because it adds an extra margin of safety and improves precision."

The graphical output from the new software depicts the blade oscillation, forward movement of the motor, and the vacuum progression in a diagrammatic format, according to Dr. Kymionis. With this information in hand, surgeons can analyze the step-by-step process of flap creation and identify how they might optimize the cutting movements or if there are potential handling errors that need to be addressed, he added.

"This software essentially converts [this] microkeratome into a 'digital mechanical microkeratome,' " Dr. Kymionis said.

The report provided by the new software also serves as excellent documentation that can be applied for a few different purposes, he said.

Surgeons can use it to show the high quality of the cuts achieved using the device to patients who have undergone surgery, as well as to prospective LASIK candidates. In that respect, it represents an excellent marketing tool for reinforcing that the practice is using state-of-the-art technology and achieving safe and excellent results, he added.

"In addition, the documentation allows the surgery center to monitor, review, and refine its procedures to ensure that high quality management standards are fulfilled," Dr. Kymionis concluded.