Angiogenesis-inhibiting compounds deal signed

January 15, 2006

Rochester, NY—Bausch & Lomb will work with two biopharmaceutical companies on the development of angiogenesis-inhibiting compounds to treat retinal disorders.

Rochester, NY-Bausch & Lomb will work with two biopharmaceutical companies on the development of angiogenesis-inhibiting compounds to treat retinal disorders.

The company signed a definitive agreement for an exclusive worldwide license with Cephalon Inc. of Frazer, PA, to develop, market, and sell ophthalmic products using small-molecule angiogenesis inhibitors to treat wet age-related macular degeneration and diabetic macular edema.

Praveen Tyle, PhD, Bausch & Lomb's chief scientific officer and senior vice president-global research & development, said preclinical data suggest the compounds stop the abnormal growth of new blood vessels and shrink existing abnormal vessels. In addition, Dr. Tyle said, the small molecular size of the compounds makes them candidates for sustained release under Bausch & Lomb's patented drug-delivery technology.

Bausch & Lomb also signed an exclusive option agreement with PTC Therapeutics Inc. to license selected PTC compounds as development candidates for therapeutic use in ophthalmology, including macular degeneration. Bausch & Lomb is particularly interested in PTC's proprietary Gene Expression Modulation by Small Molecules (GEMS) program.

Financial details were not disclosed.

In other news, Bausch & Lomb's Steven D. Silverman, vice president of information technology for global operations and engineering, was named one of the Premier 100 IT Leaders by IDG's Computerworld.

The award honors executives who show exemplary technology leadership in resolving pressing business problems. Silverman was praised for his role in implementing an enterprise resource planning system for the company that will consolidate 30 systems worldwide. He has been with the company since 1994.