Lumenis offers 'Passport to Adventure' at Field Museum

October 14, 2005

Lumenis, which celebrates 40 years of ophthalmic laser innovation this year, offered ophthalmologists a ?Passport to Adventure? at The Field Museum in downtown Chicago on Friday evening.

Chicago-Lumenis, which celebrates 40 years of ophthalmic laser innovation this year, offered ophthalmologists a “Passport to Adventure” at The Field Museum in downtown Chicago on Friday evening. The highlight of the evening, of course, was the opportunity to visit with SUE, the largest, most complete Tyrannosaurus rex ever found.

The dinosaur, which measures 42 feet long and 13 feet high with a 600-pound skull, was found in 1990 in South Dakota by fossil hunter Sue Hendrickson. Hence the name, SUE, was given to the T. rex, which roamed the earth 67 million years ago. Because the dinosaur’s head is so heavy, a cast had to be made to accompany the skeletal body. Her actual fossilized head is on display in a glass case on the second floor of Stanley Field Hall in The Field Museum.

In 1997, The Field Museum purchased SUE for more than $8 million. In May 2000, the T. rex was unveiled after 2 painstaking years of preparation and casts of her bones were made for traveling exhibits.

Lumenis is also offering ophthalmologists a chance to learn about its latest technology, selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) for glaucoma management, during the American Academy of Ophthalmology meeting here. On Saturday, Oct. 15 or Monday, Oct. 17, stop by the Lumenis Booth 3219 to hear Mark Latina, MD, speak about the evolving role of SLT in glaucoma management. On Sunday, Oct. 16, Andrew Iwach, MD, covers the current role of SLT in glaucoma management and on Monday, Oct. 17, Monte Dirks, MD, will talk about integrating SLT into your practice.