Femtosecond laser may stabilize capsule edge

April 22, 2012

Femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery seems to provide precise control of IOL positioning after healing following surgery, according to William Culbertson, MD.

Chicago-Femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery seems to provide precise control of IOL positioning after healing following surgery, according to William Culbertson, MD.

“Some studies have indicated that better optical refractive results are achieved after laser cataract removal and capsulotomy, but the responsible factors were unknown,” said Dr. Culbertson, professor of ophthalmology, and director, Cornea and Refractive Surgery Services, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

Dr. Culbertson and colleagues conducted a study in which they evaluated anterior capsular fibrosis and its effect during the first postoperative month to determine if it leads to IOL decentration or optic tilt. In this fellow eye study, they evaluated the changes in capsule size, shape, and fibrosis after laser capsulotomy and compared them between both eyes of 24 patients treated with manual capsulorhexis and the fellow eye treated with laser (Catalys, OptiMedica).

Investigators found that the manual group had more changes in diameter than the laser group (0.5-mm change versus 0.2-mm change, respectively). The circularity increased or decreased in both groups, but there was more splay in the manual group. Fibrosis developed in both groups equally and was not responsible for the changes, Dr. Culbertson said.

“The diameter, shape, and centration of the capsule in computer-controlled femtosecond laser anterior capsulotomies are accurate and reproducible,” he said.

He believes that the roundness of the capsule does not account for the difference in the changes in size over the month of the study and hypothesized that the effect of the laser somehow stabilizes the edge of the capsule.

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