'Father of angiogenesis' to deliver keynote address at AAO opening session

San Francisco-Medical researcher Judah Folkman, MD, will headline the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s (AAO) opening session during the 2007 annual meeting, set for Nov. 10 to 13 in New Orleans.

San Francisco-Medical researcher Judah Folkman, MD, will headline the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s (AAO) opening session during the 2007 annual meeting, set for Nov. 10 to 13 in New Orleans.

“It is an honor to have such a distinguished and accomplished researcher kick off our annual meeting,” said H. Dunbar Hoskins Jr., MD, AAO executive vice president. “Dr. Folkman’s work has paved the way for numerous advances in cancer research and is helping those with age-related macular degeneration [AMD] have a chance to save and possibly regain some of their eyesight.”

Dr. Folkman, a 1953 graduate of Ohio State University and 1957 graduate of Harvard Medical School, is best recognized for his inroads in angiogenesis research. In 1971, he theorized in the New England Journal of Medicine that all tumor growth relies on angiogenesis. His research sparked continued scientific interest in the subject, which ultimately has resulted in novel approaches to the treatment of diseases such as cancer and AMD. Additionally, Dr. Folkman’s laboratory purified the first angiogenic tumor protein, found the first angiogenesis inhibitors, and pursued anti-angiogenic therapy-focused clinical trials.

He has written 389 original peer-reviewed papers and 106 book chapters and monographs; he holds honorary degrees from 15 universities and has received numerous national and international awards.