Excellent results seen with toric phakic lens in Norwegian study

A study has found very high patient satisfaction with a toric phakic IOL, and the lens has been associated with very stable long-term visual and refractive outcomes and low rates of complications, according to Kjell Gunnar Gunderson, MD, who practices ophthalmology in Haugesund, Norway.

A study has found very high patient satisfaction with a toric phakic IOL, and the lens has been associated with very stable long-term visual and refractive outcomes and low rates of complications, according to Kjell Gunnar Gunderson, MD, who practices ophthalmology in Haugesund, Norway.

Dr. Gunderson and colleagues studied 180 eyes in 95 patients between October 2002 and January 2007. Mean age was 38.5 years, the patient population had slightly more females than males, and mean observation time was 27 months. Preoperative ametropia ranged from –16 to + 6 D, with a regular astigmatism between –1.5 to –6 D.

All of the lenses were implanted by the same surgeon, and the surgeries all were followed at the same clinic. All study subjects followed the same preoperative and postoperative protocols.

Mean follow-up time was 32 months (range, 2 to 52 months).

"Study eyes gained, on average, 2 lines, and the safety improved all through the observation period," Dr. Gunderson said.

In a patient survey with a 90% response rate, 90% of those in whom the lens had been implanted said their quality of vision had "dramatically improved," 80% said their quality of life had "dramatically improved," 94% said they would "definitely" recommend the lens to friends and family members, and 92% said they would "definitely" have the lens implanted again. A small decline in overall satisfaction was seen in relation to increasing patient age.

In a second survey addressing the need for visual aids after surgery, 93% of patients reported almost no need for such assistance for distance use, compared with 75% for intermediate use, and 68% for near use.

"Regarding complications,we had to re-rotate a few lenses because of postoperative leak," Dr. Gunderson said.

Additionally, one case of subretinal neovascularization occurred about 6 months after surgery, and one patient in whom a cataract developed is having the lens removed and the cataract extracted. No glaucoma, infection, or acute or chronic uveitis was seen.

"We regard the implantation of the toric [lens] for correction of high myopia to be a very safe, effective, and stable procedure," Dr. Gunderson said. "Patient response shows a very high level of patient satisfaction."