Decentration/dislocation one of the most common reasons for foldable IOL explantation

April 29, 2007

One of the most common reasons for foldable IOL explantation seems to be decentration/dislocation in one- and three-piece silicone and acrylic lenses, followed by glare and optical aberrations, explained Nick Mamalis, MD, professor of ophthalmology, Intermountain Ocular Research Center, John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City.

One of the most common reasons for foldable IOL explantation seems to be decentration/dislocation in one- and three-piece silicone and acrylic lenses, followed by glare and optical aberrations, explained Nick Mamalis, MD, professor of ophthalmology, Intermountain Ocular Research Center, John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City.

Removal of hydrophilic acrylic IOLs was most commonly attributed to calcification/opacification, Dr. Mamalis said. He reported on the 2006 results of a survey sent to members of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery and the European Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons.

"The most common complications involving foldable IOLs have changed little over the past 3 years," Dr. Mamalis said.

Apparently, incorrect lens power is not as much of a concern as it had been in the past, he said. Surgeons are better able to determine the correct lens power prior to surgery and/or corneal enhancement procedures have been utilized in patients with residual refractive error.

"Common complications [with foldable lenses] may continue to be avoided by excellent surgical technique, quality manufacturing, careful IOL folding and insertion, and accurate IOL measurements," Dr. Mamalis said.