Angle-supported IOL yields good outcomes, stable refraction

April 23, 2012

A phakic IOL (AcrySof Cachet, Alcon Laboratories) provides excellent visual acuity, high predictability, and stable refraction to patients with moderate to high myopia, according to Jeffrey Horn, MD, who presented 5-year outcome data.

Chicago-A phakic IOL (AcrySof Cachet, Alcon Laboratories) provides excellent visual acuity, high predictability, and stable refraction to patients with moderate to high myopia, according to Jeffrey Horn, MD, who presented 5-year outcome data.

The prospective, single-arm, phase I and II clinical trials included 60 patients who ranged in age from 18 to 49 years of age, noted Dr. Horn, in private practice in Nashville, TN.

Patients had an average preoperative manifest refraction spherical equivalent of –10.09 D and a preoperative refractive error between –6 and –16.5 D. Patients underwent implantation of the IOL in one eye. Investigators studied the spherical equivalent, predictability of the refraction, uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), corrected visual acuity (CVA), and the safety outcomes 5 years after implantation of the lens.

In 56 of the patients who completed the 5-year visit, 64% of patients had a postoperative UCVA of 20/20 or better, 78.6% had 20/25 or better, 87.5% had 20/30 or better, and 92.9% had 20/40 or better, Dr. Horn said. Regarding the CVA, 73.2% had 20/16 or better, 95% had 20/20 or better, 98% had 20/25 or better, and 100% had 20/30 or better.

“From preoperatively to 1 year postoperatively, there was a significant change in the preoperative refractive error resulting from implantation of the IOL that remained stable over the next 4 years,” Dr. Horn said.

The refractive predictability was very predictable, with 84% of patients within ± 0.5 D and 96.4% within 1 D of the intended correction at the 5-year time point.

“At 5 years after implantation of the . . . IOL, we demonstrated good outcomes, including good visual acuity, stable postoperative refraction, and accurate predictability of the refraction,” Dr. Horn said. “The study is ongoing through completion of the 5-year examinations.”

The IOL is an investigational angle-supported lens used to treat moderate to high myopia.

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