AAO issues conjunctivitis reminder after Costas’ infection

February 19, 2014

As Bob Costas’ eye infection caused him to step away from his Sochi Olympics reporting duties, the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) is reminding the public of the importance of seeking prompt medical treatment and practicing good hygiene to reduce the spread of what can be highly infectious eye conditions.

 

San Francisco-As Bob Costas’ eye infection caused him to step away from his Sochi Olympics reporting duties, the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) is reminding the public of the importance of seeking prompt medical treatment and practicing good hygiene to reduce the spread of what can be highly infectious eye conditions.

The media have reported that NBC’s Costas is suffering from conjunctivitis-commonly known as pink eye.

According to the AAO, people who believe that they have symptoms of conjunctivitis should see an ophthalmologist.

Practicing good hygiene can prevent the spread of bacterial and viral conjunctivitis. Those who have the condition should do the following:

·      Washing their hands often.

·      Avoid touching their eyes.

·      Do not reuse towels, washcloths, handkerchiefs, and tissues to wipe the face and eyes.

·      Change pillowcases frequently.

·      Replace eye cosmetics regularly with new ones, and do not share them with other people.

·      Avoid wearing contact lenses. To prevent infection, always clean contact lenses properly, and in cases of disposable contacts, follow the instructions of the box and dispose when advised.

“While (conjunctivitis) is often associated with children and schools where it can spread easily among students, the seriousness of Bob Costas’ reported eye infection during the Olympics is a reminder that conjunctivitis can strike at any age and can progress to a level that can even cause adults to miss work,” said Richard L. Abbott, MD, a past president of the AAO and health science clinical professor of ophthalmology and Thomas W. Boyden Endowed Chair in Ophthalmology at the University of California-San Francisco. "Fortunately, most cases of conjunctivitis are easily treatable and its transmission preventable. Diligence in getting quick medical help and practicing good hygiene to prevent spread to the other eye or individuals is the key."

To find out more information on pink eye and other eye conditions and diseases, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

 

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