Redesigned telescope prosthesis shows promising advantages

April 22, 2012

Results of a preclinical study demonstrate the feasibility of implanting a next-generation injectable version of a telescope prosthesis for end-stage macular degeneration (Implantable Miniature Telescope, VisionCare Ophthalmic Technologies) and suggest it has promising advantages for improving surgical ease and safety, said Guy Kleinmann, MD.

Chicago-Results of a preclinical study demonstrate the feasibility of implanting a next-generation injectable version of a telescope prosthesis for end-stage macular degeneration (Implantable Miniature Telescope, VisionCare Ophthalmic Technologies) and suggest it has promising advantages for improving surgical ease and safety, said Guy Kleinmann, MD.

The next-generation telescope is a modification of the FDA-approved Implantable Miniature Telescope (IMT). Whereas the IMT has polymethyl methacrylate haptics, the next-generation device features foldable silicone haptics that make it injectable and easier to implant.

Implantation of the next-generation telescope was investigated in a study where eight New Zealand White rabbits received the injectable version in one eye and the available IMT in the fellow eye. Compared with implantation of the available telescope prosthesis, the next-generation device surgeries were done through a smaller incision (6.5 versus 9.8 mm), with a smaller capsulorhexis (6 versus 7 mm), and requiring fewer sutures for incision closure (3.75 versus 6.25). In addition, the next-generation telescope was associated with a 23% reduction in operation time, a 60% reduction in early endothelial cell loss, and a significantly greater clearance from the cornea.

“The IMT, developed by Isaac Lipshitz, MD, is an important advance in visual rehabilitation for patients with macular disease, and 2-year clinical results from 206 patients with end-stage age-related macular degeneration show 60% of patients gained 3 or more lines of best-corrected visual acuity,” said Dr. Kleinmann, Department of Ophthalmology, Kaplan Medical Center, Rehovot, Israel. “However, there was 20% endothelial cell loss at 3 months after the operation that is related to the trauma of the surgery.

“The results of this preclinical study show the next-generation version may allow reduced trauma to the corneal endothelium, better control during surgery, and less induced astigmatism,” he said.

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