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ASCRS 2024: 10-year results of using two iStents with cataract surgery

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Paul Harasymowycz, MD, details his presentation "Decade-Long Outcomes of Two First-Generation Trabecular Micro-Bypass Stents with Cataract Surgery in Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma" from this year's ASCRS meeting in Boston, Massachusetts.

At this year's ASCRS meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, we caught up with Paul Harasymowycz, MD, who detailed his presentation "Decade-Long Outcomes of Two First-Generation Trabecular Micro-Bypass Stents with Cataract Surgery in Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma." Here, he shares the highlights from a decade's worth of data.

Video Transcript:

Editor's note: The below transcript has been lightly edited for clarity.

Paul Harasymowycz, MD:

Hello, I'm Dr Paul Harasymowycz, from University of Montreal and McGill University. Today we have the pleasure of presenting our 10-year results of using two [first-generation trabecular micro bypass] iStents with cataract surgery. So that's a decade of results using MIGS surgery. I think that's a very important contribution to our knowledge.

This was a real world study. In the end, we had 56 patients that we followed over time. The most important is that they had OCT stability up until 10 years. The average pressure before was higher than 18. And even after 10 years, a decade, their pressure was almost at 14. That's very important. Another finding in our study was that 75% of our patients, their pressure was below 15. And we know, usually, the lower we keep the pressure, the less likelihood is that their glaucoma will progress. And so I think that's great for our patients. In the end, it's all about the patients. And the study does show that using angle surgery may be beneficial to your patients as well.

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