Part-time patching for IXT in pediatrics

November 18, 2013

Part-time patching resulted in only a mild reduction in deterioration of intermittent exotropia (IXT), according to Brian G. Mohney, MD.

New Orleans-Part-time patching resulted in only a mild reduction in deterioration of intermittent exotropia (IXT) in pediatric patients, according to Brian G. Mohney, MD.

Dr. Mohney, Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic, presented the study results on behalf of the Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.

The randomized clinical trial of patching versus observation was conducted at 60 clinical sites and sponsored by the National Eye Institute.

Although the difference between patching and observation was statistically significant, deterioration of previously untreated childhood IXT over a 6-month period was uncommon, whether the child was patched or observed.

In the randomized trial, the Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group studied the deterioration of previously untreated childhood IXT in 358 children age 3 to 10 years.

One group was patched daily for 3 hours over 5 months, and the second group was only observed. Outcome was assessed at 6 months.

Deterioration occurred in 1% of the patching group (1 of 159) and 6% of the observation group (9 of 165), yielding a difference of 5%.

“Deterioration of previously untreated childhood IXT over a 6-month period is uncommon,” said Dr. Mohney. “Patching made a minimal difference."

For some clinicians, parents, and children, he concluded, patching may not be worth the overall effort.

This research, which is part of a 3-year study, concluded that observation and patching are both reasonable treatment options for 3 to 10 year olds with IXT.

For more articles in this issue of Ophthalmology Times Conference Brief click here.

 

 

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