OZil lab study shows effectiveness of new handpiece at symposium

March 19, 2006

A study to demonstrate the effectiveness of the oscillatory movement in the new torsional handpiece (OZil) by Alcon was the highlight of the "Innovations in Ophthalmology" symposium Sunday night. The symposium was sponsored by Dulaney Foundation and supported by an educational grant from Alcon Laboratories.

A study to demonstrate the effectiveness of the oscillatory movement in the new torsional handpiece (OZil) by Alcon was the highlight of the "Innovations in Ophthalmology" symposium Sunday night. The symposium was sponsored by Dulaney Foundation and supported by an educational grant from Alcon Laboratories.

Kerry Solomon, MD, of the Medical University of South Carolina, explained the features of the new handpiece, citing improved fluidics, less dispersion, and better thermal safety profile than using a standard ultrasound handpiece. However, to demonstrate how the OZil decreases the repulsion of nuclear material as it nears the phaco tip, Dr. Solomon provided video of a laboratory study that he and his colleagues conducted at the Medical University of South Carolina.

Dr. Solomon et al. injected cadaver eyes with microcarrier beads, then performed a phacoemulsification procedure on the eyes. Following the standard procedures for cataract surgery, the team filmed the procedures using high-speed cameras, then slowed the video to capture the flow of the beads as the phaco tip simulated the dissection of the nucleus.

First, the beads were filmed using a conventional handpiece, then they were filmed using the OZil handpiece. In the conventional sequence, the beads were constantly swirling and repulsed throughout the procedure before they finally were absorbed into the handpiece.

In the OZil sequence, the swirling motion of the beads is limited and they are quickly absorbed into the handpiece. The torsional handpiece utilizes ultrasonic oscillations at the tip, which eliminated the repulsion of the beads. The same oscillating motion occurs when absorbing nuclear material in phacoemulsification.

Dr. Solomon pointed out that the lab study is a good model to study fluidics and that additional studies could be useful in studying flow patterns.

Ronald Gross, MD, of Baylor College looked at the advances in glaucoma therapy. He outlined the various therapeutic options available, including drugs, laser trabeculoplasty, and SLT. However, the low IOP is important. Maintaining low IOP means less progression.

He pointed out the benefits and features of travoprost (Travatan) and how it consistently helps to maintain the target IOP level. He also discussed compliance and ways to improve glaucoma management.

Dan Durrie, MD, of Overland Park, KS, reviewed the latest innovations in excimer laser technology. He discussed the latest automated functions for the laser and wavefront, mentioning increased speed for faster procedures, more control for better outcomes, and more reliability. Dr. Durrie also discussed the differences between manual and automated registration and the benefits of speed in refractive surgery.

Dr. Durrie explained that the new LADARVision 6000 has many of these features, including improved operating room ergonomics and the latest registration features, as well as efficiency, consistency, and more surgeon control.

Warren Hill, MD, of Mesa, AZ, presented information on the other refractive segment, aspheric IOLs. Dr. Hill discussed the features of the three aspheric IOLs currently on the market: the AcrySof IQ (Alcon), the Tecnis Z9000 (Advanced Medical Optics), and the SofPort (Bausch & Lomb).