Ocular rigidity monitoring may be useful in refractive surgery, AMD patients

March 20, 2006

Ocular rigidity, which expresses the elastic properties of the globe, may be an indication of corneal stress following refractive surgery. This corneal stress may play a role in the development of keratectasia after corneal ablation procedures, noted Ioannis G. Pallikaris, MD, PhD, who spoke during the Innovator's Session.

Ocular rigidity, which expresses the elastic properties of the globe, may be an indication of corneal stress following refractive surgery. This corneal stress may play a role in the development of keratectasia after corneal ablation procedures, noted Ioannis G. Pallikaris, MD, PhD, who spoke during the Innovator's Session.

Dr. Pallikaris noted four parameters that may affect ocular rigidity: age, axial length, refractive error, and structural characteristics of the eye wall.

"The cornea is a living structure under a continuously fluctuating pressure load through blood flow," he said. "Localized stresses may be increased after ablation and fluctuating pressure loads may have a role in keratectasia following corneal ablation procedures. Local stresses, however, may be reduced in eyes with low rigidity."

He also noted that patients with the dry form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) had a lower ocular rigidity than those individuals with the wet form of AMD.

"It is important to develop an instrument to monitor ocular rigidity in a non-invasive way," he said.