New class of antioxidants focus of Alimera Sciences, Emory agreement

March 4, 2008

Atlanta-Alimera Sciences has entered into a second exclusive worldwide agreement with Emory University to explore oxidative stress management-specifically, the reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-as a treatment for ophthalmic diseases.

Atlanta-Alimera Sciences has entered into a second exclusive worldwide agreement with Emory University to explore oxidative stress management-specifically, the reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-as a treatment for ophthalmic diseases.

The agreement gives Alimera the exclusive option to license a class of small-molecule compounds, known as triphenylmethanes, as a potential treatment for ocular disorders such as diabetic retinopathy and non-neovascular age-related macular degeneration, particularly geographic atrophy. This agreement follows one signed by the two parties in September that gives Alimera the option to license the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) reduced form oxidase inhibitors for similar treatments.

“This second agreement with Emory expands our opportunity to develop expertise in the management of ROS and its damaging effects on the eye,” said Dan Myers, president and chief executive officer, Alimera Sciences. “Researching these compounds as well as the NADPH oxidase inhibitor compounds from our previous agreement with Emory provides Alimera with an excellent chance of addressing these significant ophthalmic disorders.”

If Alimera exercises the option in the latest agreement, the company will hold an exclusive worldwide license for the triphenylmethanes for ophthalmic indications. The agreement also grants an exclusive right to sublicense in ophthalmology and the exclusive option for non-ophthalmic use.

Alimera would be responsible for the development and commercialization of the compounds. Emory would receive milestone payments and royalties from net sales.