Motion Displacement Test on show for WGD

March 12, 2009

London-In observance of World Glaucoma Day (WGD), the Motion Displacement Test (MDT), developed by Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, in partnership with University College London (UCL) Institute of Ophthalmology and City University London was on display as part of a demonstration of the latest glaucoma diagnostic equipment.

London-In observance of World Glaucoma Day (WGD), the Motion Displacement Test (MDT), developed by Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, in partnership with University College London (UCL) Institute of Ophthalmology and City University London was on display as part of a demonstration of the latest glaucoma diagnostic equipment.

The MDT tests a patient’s field of vision and will run on a standard computer, which means it may offer an effective, portable detection method for patients. The patient is asked to look at a central white spot and to click the computer mouse each time a line on the screen is seen to move. The idea was originated by Fred Fitzke, MD, at the UCL Institute of Ophthalmology and has been developed into a clinical tool by research teams led by Ted Garway-Heath at Moorfields and David Crabb, MD, at City University London.

Faisal Ahmed, MD, glaucoma fellow of the Western Eye Hospital, London, told Ophthalmology Times Europe: “The main events include a screening at the United Kingdom’s parliament, organized by Moorfields Eye Hospital and the Royal National Institute for the Blind (RNIB), aimed at persuading the general public to get their eyes tested. Also, the International Glaucoma Association (IGA) is inviting people to use some of the latest technology under development for future diagnosis programs in hospitals [Heidelberg Tomograph 3 and HRT3, Heidelberg Engineering and the Ocular Response Analyzer, Reichert Ophthalmic].”

The Glaucoma Alliance is a new organization, looking into glaucoma diagnosis and management and in the United Kingdom is playing an integral part in raising awareness on March 12. The alliance comprises a diverse community of health professionals, including glaucoma specialists the RNIB, IGA, optometrists, pharmaceutical companies, and other charities. This year it has been responsible for producing a poster and assisting in distributing information to opticians, hospitals, and GP surgeries throughout the United Kingdom. In addition, online information and Web links were made with the General Optical Council and Royal College of Ophthalmologists.

Dr. Ahmed said: “The Glaucoma Alliance has made great efforts to inform the general public via a ‘grass roots’ approach. The RNIB has designed and produced more than 7,000 posters for distribution to the community and the IGA has provided information leaflets as well. So far we are posting posters to more than 500 health-care centers, more than 200 places of worship, and high-street chemists. In addition, not only have independent opticians put up posters but an optician chain (Specsavers) and a drugstore chain (Boots) also are taking part. Pfizer, Allergan, and Alcon Laboratories all are distributing posters to hospitals and GP surgeries.

“Charities have also become involved, and Age Concern has distributed posters to community centers, public libraries, and their own charity shops nationwide. The Royal Mail has put up posters for its 200,000 staff,” he said.

“In addition, an ethnic satellite TV channel (MATV) will devote one of its weekly health program to glaucoma, including a phone-in,” Dr. Ahmed said. “The message is that we need to make everyone from all backgrounds have [his or her] eyes checked.”

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