IOL insertion system offers single-handed planar delivery

July 1, 2005

Washington, DC—The SofPort Easy-Load Lens Delivery System (Bausch & Lomb) seems to be a giant step forward in IOL delivery. The system allows surgeons to load the lens into the inserter without the use of forceps, which eliminates damage to the IOL. The system is easy to use and cuts down surgical time, explained P. Dee G. Stephenson, MD, during the annual meeting of the American Society of Cata-ract and Refractive Surgery.

Washington, DC-The SofPort Easy-Load Lens Delivery System (Bausch & Lomb) seems to be a giant step forward in IOL delivery. The system allows surgeons to load the lens into the inserter without the use of forceps, which eliminates damage to the IOL. The system is easy to use and cuts down surgical time, explained P. Dee G. Stephenson, MD, during the annual meeting of the American Society of Cata-ract and Refractive Surgery.

"It is a revolutionary delivery system for the SofPort AO," she said. "The IOL is loaded directly from the lens case into the injector. Because of this, there is no manual contact with the IOL, no manual manipulation of the IOL, and no IOL damage as the result of manipulation. The Easy-Load system allows one-handed IOL delivery. It is easy to use and improves the IOL delivery predictability and reliability."

The inserter was designed for use with the lens model L161AO.

The body of the instrument includes a plunger and plunger control guide; a drawer and a drawer stop, which positions the lens until the surgeon is ready to insert the IOL; a drawer stop arm; the body tip, which has a reduced tip for easier entry into the wound; and a haptic puller, which straightens the leading haptic to minimize optic override.

Improved surgical efficiency In addition, in Dr. Stephenson's hands, it improves surgical efficiency thus reducing surgery time, reduces lens handling and damage caused by loading difficulties, and generally reduces the stress in the operating suite.

Dr. Stephenson, who has used the Easy-Load Lens Delivery System in 40 cases, shared her own experience and pearls. She pointed out that the instrument has a nominal learning curve and is user-friendly. The system is inserted through a 2.7-mm incision (measured after insertion) with a metal blade.

She noted that surgeons can expect an incision under 2.7 mm with a diamond blade.

Dr. Stephenson advised that surgeons avoid overusing viscoelastic agents in order to prevent the IOL from floating up. And surgeons who are right-handed should orient the lens retainer label down.

"Snap and then pull and lift to remove the lens retainer before completely closing the drawer," she commented.

"The Easy-Load system is designed for predictable, reliable IOL implantation as well as increased surgical efficiency due to the decreased time needed to load the IOL," she said. "My personal experience with the instrument has been extremely positive in that it has a nominal learning curve attached to it and is easy to use. Insertion of an IOL through a sub-2.7-mm incision is less invasive for the patient and shortens the patient's recovery time."