Intracorneal inlay increases depth of field to improve near vision

October 15, 2005

Multicenter prospective clinical trials are ongoing to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an intracorneal inlay (Accufocus) for improving near vision, said Daniel S. Durrie, MD, at the refractive surgery subspecialty day meeting sponsored by the International Society of Refractive Surgery of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Chicago-Multicenter prospective clinical trials are ongoing to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an intracorneal inlay (Accufocus) for improving near vision, said Daniel S. Durrie, MD, at the refractive surgery subspecialty day meeting sponsored by the International Society of Refractive Surgery of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

The device uses small aperture optics to increase depth of focus. It is ultra thin (approximately 10 µm thick) and constructed of an opaque biocompatible polymer that contains microperforations to permit nutrient flow. In a simple surgical procedure, the inlay is placed under a standard corneal lamellar flap or potentially in a corneal pocket.

Results from a multinational study conducted outside of the United States are encouraging. That trial involved 57 patients (mean age 50 years) who were emmetropic (natural or postLASIK) and received the implant in the non-dominant eye. Distance uncorrected visual acuity remained at a mean of 20/20 during follow-up extending to 9 months, while intermediate vision improved and near visual acuity improved significantly from its preoperative level of J9. However, there was scatter in the data for all those endpoints.

“Increasing depth of focus with this corneal inlay is a promising method for improving near vision in emmetropic presbyopes,” said Dr. Durrie, assistant clinical professor of ophthalmology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City. “Further study is needed and hopefully, we will have more information on it in the next few years.”