Glaucoma technology-driven adherence program to be tested

January 15, 2009

A clinical trial will be conducted by Johns Hopkins University's Wilmer Eye Institute on patient adherence and clinical outcomes for people with glaucoma using technology (Memotext).

Bethesda, MD-A clinical trial will be conducted by Johns Hopkins University’s Wilmer Eye Institute on patient adherence and clinical outcomes for people with glaucoma using technology (Memotext).

The Impact of Automated Dosing Reminders on Medication Adherence Using HealthVault will be a 14-month, 500-patient study to be led by Michael V. Boland, MD, PhD, of the Wilmer Eye Institute. The study will use telephone calls and text messages in an effort to improve patient outcomes by improving medication adherence.

"We believe this new interface will significantly improve medication adherence in patients with glaucoma," said Amos Adler, president of Memotext. "It is an honor to collaborate on this special grant, and we are confident this trial will demonstrate that Memotext's technology-driven adherence solutions can make a significant difference in the lives of patients managing various conditions."

Studies have shown that medication non-adherence costs North America more than $100 billion and 125,000 lives every year. Research also shows that 70% of prescriptions are not consumed and 20% of new drug prescriptions are not filled for the first time.

Approximately 40% of patients with glaucoma have difficulty taking their eye drops on a regular basis, resulting in poor care despite an appropriate physician diagnosis and treatment plan.

"Adherence to glaucoma therapy is one of the largest barriers we face in achieving therapeutic success," said glaucoma specialist Donald Budenz, MD, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami. "We have numerous effective medications to treat this disease, but if patients don't use them, they're not effective. Providing real-time reminders to improve adherence to therapy will be a major step forward in the treatment of chronic diseases such as glaucoma."