Functional and microstructural changes in eyes of patients with MS

November 13, 2007

Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) but not optic neuritis may have functional ocular impairments from chronic axonal loss, according to Güngö r Sobaci, MD, from Ankara, Turkey, reporting at the American Academy of Ophthalmology annual meeting.

Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) but not optic neuritis may have functional ocular impairmentsfrom chronic axonal loss, according to Güngör Sobaci, MD, from Ankara, Turkey, reportingat the American Academy of Ophthalmology annual meeting.

Dr. Sobaci pointed out that the retina provides a unique model of neurodegeneration. He is from theGülhane Military Medical Academy and Medical School in Ankara.

Thirty-two patients from one center and 37 controls were included in this study (19 men, 13 women;mean age, 35.6 years).

Dr. Sobaci reported that the retinal nerve fiber layer thickness was significantly thinner inpatients with MS compared with controls (68.1 µm versus 79.1 µm, respectively;p = 0.001). The retinal nerve fiber layer temporally was thinner in patients with MS comparedwith controls (p = 0.017). The central macular thickness was also thinner in MS (188.2 µmversus 203.2 µm, respectively; p = 0 .02). There was a significant difference in the P100latency value. The mean stereoacuity was 83.5 arc sec in the patients with MS compared with 22.8 arcsec in controls (p

Dr. Sobaci said, "The retinal nerve fiber layer thickness may be an objective assessment of ocularchanges in patients with MS."