Foldable intraocular telescope holds promise for patients with end-stage AMD

March 20, 2006

With approximately 14 million Americans with end-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the latest developments in low vision aids for these patients is welcoming, noted Gholam A. Peyman, MD.

With approximately 14 million Americans with end-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the latest developments in low vision aids for these patients is welcoming, noted Gholam A. Peyman, MD.

Dr. Peyman, professor of ophthalmology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, described the steps leading up to the development of the Foldable Intraocular Telescope (FIT). He spoke during the Innovator's Session at the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery annual meeting.

In 1988, he presented the concept behind FIT, which is basically a posterior chamber IOL with a telescopic zone and peripheral zone.

"The patient will be able to have full peripheral visual field without spectacles," Dr. Peyman said. "If the patient would like to read, he uses the plus lens in the telescope and the minus lens inside the eye. It provides 2.4x magnification."

From this concept, the foldable version, FIT, was developed with bifocal capabilities. This 5.8-mm foldable IOL system consists of a telescope measuring 1.5 mm in diameter and 3.5 mm in height. A 4.5-mm corneal incision is need for its implantation, he said.

"FIT provides patients with 3x magnification. For the surgeon it provides easier implantation," he said.

Dr. Peyman also discussed the development of a power-adjustable contact lens for the correction of myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism. One of the advantages of this lens is the ability to correct higher-order aberrations, Dr. Peyman said.