Fixed combination of antibiotic/corticosteroid aids drug delivery

May 1, 2010

A new formulation of the fixed antibiotic/corticosteroid combination containing tobramycin and dexamethasone offers several improved characteristics that make it a viable therapeutic option for the management of inflammatory ocular conditions where a risk of bacterial infection exists.

Norfolk, VA-A new formulation of the fixed antibiotic/corticosteroid combination containing tobramycin and dexamethasone offers several improved characteristics that make it a viable therapeutic option for the management of inflammatory ocular conditions where a risk of bacterial ocular infection exists, said Stephen V. Scoper, MD.

Dr. Scoper was an investigator in a clinical trial evaluating the new fixed combination and the lead author of a published paper [Adv Ther. 2008;25:77-88] reporting on that study and several in vitro and animal investigations. He is vice president, Virginia Eye Consultants, and associate professor of ophthalmology, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk.

In addition, the higher concentrations of antibiotic achieved in ocular tissues using the new tobramycin/dexamethasone formulation translate into improved antibacterial activity against tobramycin-resistant and methicillin-resistant strains of two common ocular pathogens.

"TobraDex has been the most widely prescribed steroid/antibiotic ophthalmic combination product and is highly effective," Dr. Scoper said.

However, the new product represents an improved formulation with a number of benefits that should increase its activity in the treatment and prevention of inflammation and bacterial infections, he said.

"It was very exciting to be involved in the clinical research and the publication for what I consider to be a great new product," Dr. Scoper said. "In particular, I am looking forward to using TOBRADEX ST for the treatment of blepharitis, a condition that I am affected by myself, because of its promise for addressing the challenge of achieving adequate drug concentrations in lid tissue."