Fibrin glue in amniotic membrane transplant helps repair symptomatic conjunctivochalasis

September 11, 2005

Lisbon, Portugal - When treating conjunctivochalasis, which is characterized by dissolution of Tenon’s membrane, replacement by amnionic membrane held in place by fibrin glue reinforces the membrane, according to Thomas John, MD, who reported his findings Sunday at the European Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons meeting. Dr. John is from Loyola University at Chicago, Maywood, IL, United States.

Lisbon, Portugal - When treating conjunctivochalasis, which is characterized by dissolution of Tenon’s membrane, replacement by amnionic membrane held in place by fibrin glue reinforces the membrane, according to Thomas John, MD, who reported his findings Sunday at the European Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons meeting. Dr. John is from Loyola University at Chicago, Maywood, IL, United States.

Dr. John et al. used this technique in 24 eyes of 16 patients (10 women, 6 men; average age, 63 years). Eight of the patients were treated bilaterally. Preoperatively, their symptoms included a foreign body sensation, redness, inflammation, and tearing.

The fibrin glue (Baxter) has two components: thrombin and fibrinogen. Dr. John explained that he prefers to apply the components separately to achieve better control. During the procedure, the amniotic membrane is applied stromal side down, glued into place, and the conjunctival opening is sealed with glue.

After surgery, he reported, “the patients had dramatic relief of symptoms and the fibrin glue effectively anchored the amniotic membrane in the space between conjunctiva and Tenon’s membrane.”

He also noted that use of the glue results in a shorter surgical time compared with the standard surgery and increases the ease of postoperative healing.