CK used for patients with LASIK, PRK complications

October 17, 2005

Conductive keratoplasty (CK) may afford a useful tool to correct optical complications of LASIK and PRK when further laser surgery is contraindicated, said Peter S. Hersh, MD, professor of ophthalmology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-New Jersey Medical School.

Chicago-Conductive keratoplasty (CK) may afford a useful tool to correct optical complications of LASIK and PRK when further laser surgery is contraindicated, said Peter S. Hersh, MD, professor of ophthalmology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-New Jersey Medical School.

CK is FDA-approved for correction of presbyopia and hyperopia; using it as a rescue procedure is an off-label application, Dr. Hersh said.

He provided results of a study in which he performed CK in 16 eyes of 15 patients who had LASIK and PRK complications and in whom further laser surgery or flap manipulation was inadvisable. Dr. Hersh performed 28 procedures; 8 eyes had CK twice, 1 eye 3 times, and 1 eye 4 times. The average number of spots was 15.

Uncorrected visual acuity averaged 20/68 preoperatively versus 20/37 postoperatively, while near UVCA improved from 20/102 to 20/39. Mean MRSE was +1.06 before surgery and –0.33 afterward. Best spectacle-corrected visual acuity remained unchanged in most eyes, averaging 20/23 before and after CK was performed.

Astigmatism results showed a change from 1.88 D preoperatively to 0.81 D postoperatively. Nine of 15 eyes improved >0.5 D, 5/15 were unchanged, and 1/15 was worse.