Bevacizumab effective for chronic and recurrent central serous chorioretinopathy

June 1, 2007

Intravitreal bevacizumab (Avastin, Genentech) is an effective option for the treatment of chronic or recurrent central serous chorioretinopathy, said Mitzy Torres-Soriano, MD, of the Retina Service, Asociation Para Evitar La Ceguera, Hospital "Dr. Luis Sanchez Bulnes," Mexico City.

Intravitreal bevacizumab (Avastin, Genentech) is an effective option for the treatment of chronic or recurrent central serous chorioretinopathy, said Mitzy Torres-Soriano, MD, of the Retina Service, Asociation Para Evitar La Ceguera, Hospital "Dr. Luis Sanchez Bulnes," Mexico City, Mexico.

Dr. Torres-Soriano and colleagues conducted a prospective, noncomparative case series to test the safety and efficacy of bevacizumab for the treatment of chronic (defined as symptoms present for longer than 6 months) or recurrent (defined as more than one episode of the disease).

Six eyes of six patients were included. The patients were treated with one intravitreal injection of bevacizumab at a dose of 2.5 mg. The investigators evaluated the best-corrected visual acuity, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography (OCT) at baseline and at 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment, according to Dr. Torres-Soriano,

Dr. Torres-Soriano reported that five patients had chronic disease and one patient had recurrent disease.

"The visual acuity improved in all cases by 1 month after treatment and remained stable until the examination at the third month," she said. The median best-corrected visual acuity improved from 20/200 at baseline to 20/100 at 1 month and 20/50 at 3 months.

"We observed decreased neurosensory retinal and retinal pigment epithelial detachment on OCT. The retinal thickness decreased from 375.83 ± 92.34 µm to 252.5 ± 58.28 µm at 1 month and 223 ± 69.5 µm at 3 months posttreatment. There was a decrease in fluorescein leakage and improved choroidal hyperpermeability seen on indocyanine green angiography. Two patients required a second injection of bevacizumab," Dr. Torres-Soriano commented. No adverse events developed.

The investigators concluded that intravitreal bevacizumab was well tolerated and resulted in a significant improvement in visual acuity. Although the results are promising, further studies are needed.