ARVO chooses innovation as theme for annual gathering

April 1, 2008

More than 10,000 vision researchers, practitioners, and others from around the world are expected to journey to the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology's 80th annual meeting, set for Sunday, April 27, to Thursday, May 1, in Fort Lauderdale, FL. Attendees will explore the latest techniques, protocols, and tools in development and use by ophthalmic researchers through education courses, lectures, poster and paper presentations, special-interest group and general business gatherings, mini-symposia and symposia, and workshops.

Fort Lauderdale, FL-"Eyes on Innovation" is the theme for the 2008 Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) 80th annual meeting, set here for Sunday, April 27, to Thursday, May 1.

This meeting always offers a chance for vision researchers and practitioners to explore the latest techniques, protocols, and tools in development and use by ophthalmic researchers. More than 10,000 professionals from around the world are expected to journey to this annual rite of spring.

Kurzweil was the principal developer of the first charge-coupled device flat-bed scanner, the first omni-font optical character recognition technology, the first print-to-speech reading machine for the blind, the first text-to-speech synthesizer, the first music synthesizer capable of recreating the grand piano and other orchestral instruments, and the first commercially marketed large-vocabulary speech recognition equipment.

Among Kurzweil's many honors is the Lemelson-MIT Prize, a prestigious award for innovation. Also, in 1999, he received the National Medal of Technology, the nation's highest honor in technology, from President Bill Clinton.