Art exhibit focuses on macular degeneration

Sep 02, 2009

To mark the global observance of AMD [age-related macular degeneration] Week, Lighthouse International and AMD Alliance International (AMDAI) will host an exhibit of the works of London-based portrait artist Adam Hahn, whose paintings illustrate how patients with AMD see the world.

New York—To mark the global observance of AMD [age-related macular degeneration] Week, Lighthouse International and AMD Alliance International (AMDAI) will host an exhibit of the works of London-based portrait artist Adam Hahn, whose paintings illustrate how patients with AMD see the world.

The exhibit of about 15 portraits will open Sept. 17 at Lighthouse International, 111 E. 59 St. in New York City. Hahn will discuss his works. The show, which is free and open to the public, will continue on Sept. 18. Hours on both days will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The artist’s works are the result of more than a year of study of AMD. Before painting each portrait, Hahn spoke at length with the subjects about what they can and cannot see. The paintings are designed to illustrate how the individuals in the portraits would see themselves through the blur of their limited vision.

“Normally, my work shows how I view the person sitting for the portrait,” he said. “Through these works, I show how the subjects see themselves and others.”

Hahn created the portraits in memory of his grandmother, who was affected by AMD. To view a video of him and his work, visit www.amdalliance.org/resources/videos.php.

“We are excited to bring Adam’s portraits to the United States, because so many people are not familiar with macular degeneration and its devastating effects,” said David Herman, chairman of AMDAI. “Our goal is to raise awareness about the disease and, in the process, encourage people to seek regular eye exams to catch the disease early to avoid vision loss.”

Ted Francavilla, acting president and chief executive officer of Lighthouse International, said, “This special exhibit is a unique blend of art and science. Adam’s work deepens our understanding of the distressing effects of AMD on vision. It is a call for people with AMD to take action and get the special help they need at any stage of the disease.”

The exhibit was made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Genentech. Its opening coincides with the Lighthouse International Technology Expo (LITE) 2009. LITE aims to showcase the latest in assistive and everyday accessible technology and devices for people who are visually impaired. That event also is free and open to the public.