2006 ASCRS symposium celebrates past, future of ophthalmology

March 18, 2006

The opening general session Saturday morning officially kicked off the 32nd annual American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery (ASCRS) symposium with a glance at ophthalmology's past and a commitment to build a bridge to the profession's future.

The opening general session Saturday morning officially kicked off the 32nd annual American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery (ASCRS) symposium with a glance at ophthalmology's past and a commitment to build a bridge to the profession's future.

Roger F. Steinert, MD, outgoing ASCRS president (shown at right), welcomed members, colleagues, and friends to the meeting. Dr. Steinert summarized his term as "an extraordinary honor and privilege."

He thanked many individuals for supporting his tenure, but singled out the ASCRS staff for its energy, devotion, and creativity, saying that the ASCRS "would not be the success that it is today or the even greater organization that we know it will be tomorrow."

After reviewing recent ASCRS accomplishments and current critical issues facing ophthalmology, Dr. Steinert turned over the presidency to Samuel Masket, MD (shown at right). Among the topics Dr. Masket addressed were concerns over pay for performance (P4P) and what he termed the "surgical-industrial complex."

"Matters of corporate influence are a delicate balance," Dr. Masket said. "As a guiding principle, we can say that what's good for the patient is good for the doctor and is good for the industry. If it isn't good for the patient, in the long run it isn't going to be good for anyone."

Honored guests at the meeting were H. Dunbar Hoskins Jr., MD, and Thomas R. Mazzocco, MD. The 2006 Ophthalmology Hall of Fame Awards inductee was Algernon B. Reese, MD. Accepting the award posthumously on behalf of their father were Dr. Reese's two sons.